About Us – Edge Lighting

About Us

Edge Lighting Services Ltd was established in 2005 to meet the demand in the market for a company that is flexible enough and small enough to meet the individual needs of end users but large enough to be able to fulfil large scale projects at competitive prices.

 

Edge Lighting’s motto is – Quality, Value, Service. and this really sums up what we offer to our customers. We have access to the latest technology in lighting design software, lighting components and manufacturing capability, so we are able to manufacture small quantities of bespoke luminaires or supply many thousands of standard luminaires.

 

Due to our ability to react quickly to customer demands we have expanded despite general market conditions. Between our senior staff members we have over 100 years experience in the lighting industry so we are confident in being able to supply the correct solution for virtually any application.

 

Please feel free to contact us regarding any lighting application, our personal and flexible approach to the market means you will get a quick and honest response, especially with regard to feasibility and practicality of desired lighting solutions.

EDGE Lighting Services Ltd is committed to ensuring that it fulfils its obligations to operate fairly, justly and in accordance with the laws outlined below. In particular, no employee or potential employee shall be discriminated against on grounds of gender, race or disability. We also extend the concept of equal opportunity to include discrimination on grounds of religious or political beliefs or sexual orientation.

 

This policy is regularly monitored to ensure that the objectives are achieved. It will be reviewed and, if necessary, revised in the light of legislative or organizational changes.

 

There are a number of Acts of Parliament that deal with discrimination. The following conveys an understanding of these laws and our obligations under this legislation:

 

Sex Discrimination Act 1975
The Sex Discrimination Act 1975 (SDA) makes it unlawful to discriminate on grounds of sex or marital status in recruitment, promotion and training.

 

  • Direct sex discrimination occurs when a person of one sex is treated less favourably on grounds of sex than a person of the other sex would have been treated in the same circumstances.
  • Indirect sex discrimination can occur where a requirement or condition is applied equally to men and women, but the proportion of one sex that can satisfy the ...

EDGE Lighting Services Ltd is committed to ensuring that it fulfils its obligations to operate fairly, justly and in accordance with the laws outlined below. In particular, no employee or potential employee shall be discriminated against on grounds of gender, race or disability. We also extend the concept of equal opportunity to include discrimination on grounds of religious or political beliefs or sexual orientation.

 

This policy is regularly monitored to ensure that the objectives are achieved. It will be reviewed and, if necessary, revised in the light of legislative or organizational changes.

 

There are a number of Acts of Parliament that deal with discrimination. The following conveys an understanding of these laws and our obligations under this legislation:

 

Sex Discrimination Act 1975
The Sex Discrimination Act 1975 (SDA) makes it unlawful to discriminate on grounds of sex or marital status in recruitment, promotion and training.

 

  • Direct sex discrimination occurs when a person of one sex is treated less favourably on grounds of sex than a person of the other sex would have been treated in the same circumstances.
  • Indirect sex discrimination can occur where a requirement or condition is applied equally to men and women, but the proportion of one sex that can satisfy the condition is much smaller than the proportion of the other sex. Unless it can be proven that the condition is essential for the job, indirect discrimination may have taken place. It has also been established that discrimination against part-time workers may constitute indirect discrimination against women because nationally, and in most organizations, the majority of part-time workers are women. Restricting employment by means of age limits is another possible instance of indirect discrimination.
  • The third type of discrimination covered by the Act is victimization. This occurs when an individual is discriminated against because they have exercised their rights under the Act.

 

Race Relations Act 1976
The Race Relations Act 1976 (RRA) makes it unlawful to discriminate on grounds of race, colour, nationality or ethnic or national origin. This Act covers recruitment, promotion and training. The Act covers direct discrimination, indirect discrimination and victimization. Examples of indirect discrimination would include recruiting from sources, which exclude areas of high settlement of minority ethnic groups or insisting on British qualifications. Word of mouth recruitment in an organization where people from ethnic minority communities are under-represented would also constitute indirect discrimination.

 

Section 8 of the Asylum and Immigration Act 1996, which came into effect on 27th January 1997 is also relevant. It deals with the issue of illegal working and makes it a criminal offence to employ a person who is not entitled to live or work in the United Kingdom. The act obliges employers to check that new employees are entitled to live and work in the UK by carrying out a number of checks before employment commences. The Commission for Racial Equality has warned that employers should ensure that any changes they make to their recruitment and selection procedure to comply with the new act do not put them in breach of the Race Relations Act. In particular, the CRE guidance states that employers should ensure that the checks (including documentation requests and their retention) are carried out at the same stage and in the same way for all applicants and without bias or discrimination on the basis of their race, colour or ethnic background.

 

Equal Pay Acts 1970 and 1983
The Equal Pay Act (1970) came into force originally at the end of 1975 and its purpose was to eliminate discrimination in pay between men and women. It was amended in 1983 to include work of equal value and most claims are now under this part of the Act. The Act allows an individual to claim pay equal to that received by members of the opposite sex on the grounds that they are doing:

 

  • Like work
  • Work rated as equivalent under a job evaluation scheme
  • Work of Equal Value – in terms of demands made under such headings as effort, skill and decision-making

 

Claims can be pursued through the Employment Tribunal system.

 

Disability Discrimination Act 1995
The employment sections of the Disability Discrimination Act came into effect on 2nd December 1996. This Act operates in a similar way to the Race Relations Act and the Sex Discrimination Act, but also places a duty on an employer to make ‘reasonable adjustments’ to premises or working practices to allow a disabled person to be employed.

 

The definition of disability is wide and includes physical disabilities, sensory disabilities (visual or hearing impairment), learning difficulties, mental health problems as well as progressive conditions such as Multiple Sclerosis and Aids.

 

Human Rights Act 1998
The Human Rights Act was incorporated into UK law on 1st October 2000 and is intended to implement the European Convention on Human Rights in the UK. The latter outlines several issues, including rights to freedom of thought, conscience & religion, the right to respect for private and family life and in particular, ‘The enjoyment of the rights and freedoms… shall be secured without discrimination on any ground such as sex, race, colour, language, religion, political or other opinion, national or social origin, association with a national minority, property, birth or other status.’

 

In terms of recruitment it may outlaw discrimination on grounds of sexual orientation, religious belief or possibly family circumstances in addition to the types of discrimination discussed above.

 

We also check that our suppliers are complying to local employment law, at least in line with ILO (International Labour Organisation) standards.

Edge Lighting are committed to leading the industry in minimizing the impact of its activities on the environment. The key points of our strategy to achieve this are:

 

  • Minimize waste by evaluating operations and ensuring they are as efficient as possible.
  • Minimize our carbon footprint through the selection and use of its fleet and the source of its power requirement.
  • Actively promote recycling both internally and amongst its customers and suppliers.
  • Promote a lighting range to minimize the environmental impact in both manufacture and through life use of the product by using recyclable materials where possible and using the most efficient lamps and control gear available, and by assessing new technology as it becomes available.
  • Meet or exceed all the environmental legislation that relates to the Company.
  • Meet the obligations of the Waste Electrical and Electronic Equipment (WEEE) regulations by registering with an approved compliance scheme, registration number WEEE/JA0061TU.
  • Provide product information and mark our products showing that they will not be disposed of but recycled.
  • Edge Lighting are also committed to developing a range of “Hybrid” luminaires combining the benefits of piped natural daylight and using artificial light only when necessary.

Edge Lighting are committed to leading the industry in minimizing the impact of its activities on the environment. The key points of our strategy to achieve this are:

 

  • Minimize waste by evaluating operations and ensuring they are as efficient as possible.
  • Minimize our carbon footprint through the selection and use of its fleet and the source of its power requirement.
  • Actively promote recycling both internally and amongst its customers and suppliers.
  • Promote a lighting range to minimize the environmental impact in both manufacture and through life use of the product by using recyclable materials where possible and using the most efficient lamps and control gear available, and by assessing new technology as it becomes available.
  • Meet or exceed all the environmental legislation that relates to the Company.
  • Meet the obligations of the Waste Electrical and Electronic Equipment (WEEE) regulations by registering with an approved compliance scheme, registration number WEEE/JA0061TU.
  • Provide product information and mark our products showing that they will not be disposed of but recycled.
  • Edge Lighting are also committed to developing a range of “Hybrid” luminaires combining the benefits of piped natural daylight and using artificial light only when necessary.

General lighting maintenance and disposal instructions:

Note: Maintenance and Emergency lighting testing should only be carried out by a correctly qualified operative. When working at height ensure risks are fully accessed and use appropriate safety precautions.

Ensure fitting is switched off and completely cooled down before cleaning and completely isolated before any electrical maintenance work.

 

Cleaning

Do not use abrasive cleaning agents, dusting with a dry cloth is all that should be required. If further cleaning is necessary use a mild soap solution and soft cloth, only use a damp cloth and wipe off excessive liquid.

 

LED Changing

It is unlikely that the LED will have failed. If the fitting is not working, check the mains supply first and then see below to change the LED driver. If the driver has been changed and the fitting is still not working, you can change the LED board by disconnecting it and removing all the fixings and replacing like for like. When handling the LED do not touch the yellow coatings on the individual LEDs.

 

LED Driver Changing

In some cases when an LED seems to have failed, it is more likely to be the driver gear. This can be ascertained if you install a new lamp, or take a ...

General lighting maintenance and disposal instructions:

Note: Maintenance and Emergency lighting testing should only be carried out by a correctly qualified operative. When working at height ensure risks are fully accessed and use appropriate safety precautions.

Ensure fitting is switched off and completely cooled down before cleaning and completely isolated before any electrical maintenance work.

 

Cleaning

Do not use abrasive cleaning agents, dusting with a dry cloth is all that should be required. If further cleaning is necessary use a mild soap solution and soft cloth, only use a damp cloth and wipe off excessive liquid.

 

LED Changing

It is unlikely that the LED will have failed. If the fitting is not working, check the mains supply first and then see below to change the LED driver. If the driver has been changed and the fitting is still not working, you can change the LED board by disconnecting it and removing all the fixings and replacing like for like. When handling the LED do not touch the yellow coatings on the individual LEDs.

 

LED Driver Changing

In some cases when an LED seems to have failed, it is more likely to be the driver gear. This can be ascertained if you install a new lamp, or take a lamp that is known to work from an adjacent fitting and it still does not work.

Unplug the luminaire from the mains connector, open the terminal cover from the Driver. Make a note of the connections from the mains supply and outgoing connections to the lamps.

Remove wires from old driver and insert into new driver ensuring correct wires go to correct terminals.

Close cable cover and ensure cable is properly retained and gripped. Re-connect to mains supply.

 

Disposal

LED lighting equipment is covered by the WEEE regulations and must be taken to registered disposal site. Edge Lighting’s registration number is WEEE/JA006ITU. This should be quoted when taking lighting fittings to the recycling point.

Any emergency fittings must have the batteries removed and disposed of separately.

It is not Edge Lighting’s responsibility to collect or transport waste to a recycling site, our obligations are covered by the WEEE compliance scheme and take care of the onward recycling costs from that point. Edge Lighting Services Ltd at the time of supply for collection or transportation to waste recycling sites.

A list of Approved Authorised Treatment Facilities (AATF’s) can be found on the Environment Agency Web site, alternatively there are many commercially run sites such as easyweee.com, weeerecyclecentre.co.uk, simsrecycling.com.